WTLFT: June 2016

31 05 2016

Haven’t done one of these in a while! Necessity is the mother of re-invention, I suppose. Tonight, I’m in the rare position of being caught up on all current reviews and, rather than dig through the hundred or so in my backlog that need to be written, decided to cast a glance forward.

So, what to look forward to in June 2016 at the movies? Current release-wise, there sure isn’t much – save maybe “Finding Dory,” which I’m hoping will not be another “Cars 2” from Pixar. So I’m mostly going to count on repertory screenings and other more eclectic venues to provide my moviegoing fun for the month. Here’s a little bit of what I’m working with in Houston (since virtually none of the indie releases I want to see have been booked yet, grr):

June 5

Infinitely Polar Bear” was a pleasant surprise among indie releases last summer, with Mark Ruffalo pulling off an impressively committed performance that could have so easily flown off the rails. It’s making a brief comeback after a short stint in Houston for a one-night only event to benefit Jewish Family Service of Houston. Young professionals even get a special price of $25, which includes lots of food and 8th Wonder Brewery beer. All things considered, a pretty good deal for a good cause. And any movie is better with people than it is to watch alone on Starz via your Apple TV.

June 10/11

This could potentially be the back-to-back movie night champion of them all. On Friday, June 10, the Houston Museum of Natural Science is showing an all-time favorite of mine, Steven Spielberg’s “Raiders of the Lost Ark,” on their giant IMAX screen. And somehow, it’s only $5!

Then, the following evening, Alamo Drafthouse is presenting a double-feature of “Raiders”-related films. This is not your average retrospective, mind you. The first film is “Raiders: The Adaptation,” a fan film from the ’80s made by a bunch of Spielberg-inspired teenagers, which has gone on to gain cult status. The second is a new documentary about the making of that film, titled “Raiders: The Story of the Greatest Fan Film Ever Made.” Better yet, two of the original filmmakers will be in attendance. Pretty sweet stuff!

June 19

Also at Alamo Drafthouse (but their Mason Park location), assuming that I’m not otherwise tied up with Father’s Day activities, I’ll be headed to see “The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly” on the big screen. Shamefully, I have never seen it. But hey, three hour films aren’t so bad when you can order food without getting up from your seat!

June 22

Market Square Park in Downtown Houston is presenting an outdoor screening of an all-time great from the Coen Brothers, 1996’s “Fargo.” The irony is not lost on me that the temperature could be triple digits outside while watching a film set in sub-zero temperatures.

June 24

Musical biopics have gotten pretty subpar these days, I’ll admit. But even though it might run the standard playbook, I will always have a soft spot for “Walk the Line.” At the very least, Joaquin Phoenix and Reese Witherspoon are a pair for the ages. And yes, I will stay up to watch it at midnight when it plays at the River Oaks Theater.

June 26

I’m really digging the synergy in Brazos Bookstore’s “Summer of Kubrick” series, which engages both readers and film buffs across town with tandem book clubs and movie screenings. I’m totally planning to dust off my copy of “A Clockwork Orange” that has sat unread on my bookshelf for nearly a decade for August, but in the month of June, I’m just planning to attend the “2001: A Space Odysseyscreening at the Alamo Drafthouse. Maybe seeing it on the big screen will help me finally lock into Kubrick’s deliberate (read: almost unbearably slow) pacing.

(P.S. – This trailer, cut by the BFI for a 2014 rerelease, is worth watching.)

And depending on the films they show, I’m also hoping to make a trip out to Showboat in the outskirts of town for my first drive-in movie experience!





What To Look Forward To: January 2015

4 01 2015

Inherent ViceI haven’t used this category of post in almost three years, so I figure it’s due for a good dusting off.  Here, I’ll give you a sense of what I’ll be up to this month at “Marshall and the Movies” and what might be cooking at a theater near you.

F.I.L.M. of the Week

You might have already noticed (that’s doubtful), but I have chosen to move my long-running “F.I.L.M. of the Week” column from Friday to Thursday.  The decision was manifold.  First, I wanted to take advantage of #tbt opportunities on Facebook.  Second, I needed the space on Friday to run reviews of new releases, which are often embargoed until opening day.  I look forward to bringing the same underseen or underrated titles to your attention on a new day!

Paul Thomas Anderson

I hinted last month that I would post a recap of the “On Cinema” that I heard PTA give, but I wound up focusing all my efforts on finishing all my 2014 reviews.  That and a ranked filmography will be coming next week to celebrate the release of “Inherent Vice.”

Tina and AmyGolden Globes Live Blog

One last hurrah for Tina and Amy!  I’ll be typing my thoughts the whole time.

Sundance Spotlight

The year always gets an injection of fresh energy from the outset thanks to Sundance, the American festival committed to highlighting new voices in the world of independent film.  To run parallel with the 2015 festival, I will be publishing a daily review of a film that came out of Sundance – both the good and the bad.

A Most Violent Year

Finally, I can share my thoughts – January 30, unless A24 changes their minds.

In theaters

I am SO stoked for “American Sniper” on January 16.  Holy cow.

In terms of actual January releases, though, the film that most intrigues me is “Girlhood.”

It’s going to be a good month (I hope!) – what are YOU looking forward to?





WTLFT: April 2012

12 03 2012

Hard to believe April is almost upon us.  It feels like 2012 has just begun, and now we’re in the vamp-up month for summer tentpole season!  Let’s see what this year’s crop looks like…

April 6

I would normally be skeptical of a four-quel that comes 9 years after the last installment and touts itself as a reunion … but “American Reunion” does look some kind of funny.  We’re all allowed some exceptions, right?

The weekend’s other big release is a re-release, “Titanic 3D.”  No thanks, James Cameron, unless you have an alternate ending planned … I’m still upset that Kate Winslet didn’t let Leo on the big door.

“Damsels in Distress,” starring the creepy babysitter/amateur pornographer from “Crazy Stupid Love,” looks like it has some potential to be funny.  That is, if mumblecore queen Greta Gerwig doesn’t sourpuss it all the way down to the core.

Looking to capitalize off of “The Hunger Games”-mania for Josh Hutcherson (hoping he will become the new Robert Pattinson or Taylor Lautner, I assume), his star-vehicle “Detention” hits theaters just two weeks later.  This SXSW 2011 horror-comedy looks like it might have some potential barring it isn’t stupid beyond belief.

April 13

I’ve never been a Joss Whedon fanboy, but I understand that there’s a significant portion of the Internet that is.  So they can rejoice at their appetizer for May’s “The Avengers,” his horror-comedy “The Cabin in the Woods.”  I, on the other hand, will still try to figure out what it is that has the Web so enamored with this man’s work.

Poor Guy Pearce needs to get his game face back on.  After bursting onto the scene with “L.A. Confidential” and “Memento,” he’s faded into obscurity.  He pops up here and there in Best Picture winners “The Hurt Locker” and “The King’s Speech” … and also in Adam Sandler’s “Bedtime Stories.”  Maybe “Lockout” will get him back on track.  But more likely not since any movie where you share the screen with Maggie Grace and Peter Stormare holds little promise.

The Farrelly Brothers need another “There’s Something About Mary” to revive their career because “Hall Pass” sure wasn’t going to do it. Maybe “The Three Stooges” will be better than the trailer, but from that, I’m sensing an epic disaster as two distinct comedy styles butt heads.

Word on the street is that Michelle Yeoh “coulda been a contendah” for the Oscar as Aung San Suu Kyi in “The Lady.”  Looks baity, no?  For a real Oscar nominee, see Best Foreign Film nominee “Monsieur Lazhar” from the exotic lands of Canada.

April 20

Think Like a Man” should be retitled “Tyler Perry’s All-Star Team Presents Steve Harvey’s Think Like a Man.”  Then I think it would outsell “The Hunger Games” for sure.

The Lucky One” should be retitled “An Actual Nicholas Sparks Adaptation: The Lucky One (Zac Efron Might Get Naked).”  Then it would double the receipts of “The Vow.”

Chimpanzee” should be retitled “The Real Planet of the Apes.”  Then it might stop the downward slide of DisneyNature movies off a box office cliff.

In other news, if you are interested to see just how far Diane Keaton can fall from “Annie Hall,” the answer awaits you in “Darling Companion.”

April 27

I have zero shame in saying that the April release I’m most excited for is “The Five-Year Engagement.”  It’s beyond guilty pleasure territory.  Jason Segel and Emily Blunt together in one movie, plus Chris Pratt, plus a very interesting concept that might actually move beyond the cliches?  Count me SO in.

There’s also an indie winner of the week, “Sound of My Voice.”  It stars Brit Marling, star of last year’s Sundance bust “Another Earth,” although she’s totally absent in this WTF-worthy trailer.  But rather than being turned off, I’m very intrigued.  This ought to be good.

Someone should have told Aardman that the pirates fad was over in 2007 … but since no one did, we get “The Pirates! Band of Misfits.”  And thanks to “The Raven,” Edgar Allen Poe just got a lot scarier than reading him in high school English.

Also, is it just me or is Jason Statham this decade’s Steven Seagal?  When the narrator for “Safe” said the most wanted girl was 12 years old, I just started bursting out laughing.  Now Statham is wading into straight-to-video territory, let’s all kick back and enjoy.

So, what are YOU looking forward to in April?  Sound off in the comments or vote in the poll!





WTLFT: October 2011

28 09 2011

Can I get a collective “WHOOP WHOOP” for my return from the first month of college hiatus? [pause] If any of you all are still out there (doubtful), you can be louder!  So I’ll need you to comment (shameless plug for commenting).

While I’m on my winning streak of humor, I’ll funnel this goodwill into making you read my post about what to look forward to in October.  Reviews will be coming soon for “50/50,” “Drive,” and “Warrior” with hopes that I’ll find time to squeeze in “The Debt,” “Contagion,” and “Moneyball” somehow between classes, homework, and a social life of sorts.

October is my probably my favorite month of the year, not just for the selfish reason that it’s my month of birth.  It’s a great month to be outside; I’m especially excited this year that I will be out of Texas and in a place where I can experience fall and changing seasons.  It’s also a time of changing seasons at your movie theater, out with summer leftovers and slightly dumpy September fare and in with late-year commercial fare and some early awards plays.  Here’s what 2011 has to offer us in the month of October:

October 7

The best of the month may come in its first weekend with “The Ides of March,” a political thriller written, produced, and directed by George Clooney, who also puts in some time in front of the camera.  The real star is Ryan Gosling as a campaign manager torn between opposing sides of a presidential race.  The movie will surely have important and relevant implications for the way that the modern campaign is run and will no doubt be a major player in the Oscar race this year.  Even if it’s just an early check on your best of 2011 laundry list, this has to be a must-see for every cinephile.

Meanwhile, “Real Steel” … yeah, can’t say I have the highest of hopes for that.  “Transformers” already gave me plenty of clanging metal this year.

On the other side of the tracks, there’s Juno Temple in “Dirty Girl,” a story of sexual mores in 1987 Oklahoma.  It stars Juno Temple, who will have a role in “The Dark Knight Rises,” so it may be worthwhile to see just to say you knew who she was before her breakout (if indeed she does do that).

In case you haven’t had enough Jessica Chastain this year between “The Debt,” “The Help,” and “The Tree of Life,” she also appears in “Texas Killing Fields,” which – no offense to the talent involved – looks like one of those C-list movies you’d find on the “just added” section of Netflix streaming between “Tangled” and “The Expendables.”

This weekend also brings a strange extreme with “The Human Centipede 2: Full Sequence,” which looks to overcome the sequel slump by presenting a story of life imitating art (if you want to call the gross-out horror film that shocked audiences last year art).  It’s a must for sadists and horror fanatics; others would do best to just stay home.

October 14

This Friday marks my birthday … and Hollywood celebrates by releasing two remakes and a Jack Black comedy.  Mental confetti just splattered the walls of my brain.

“Men of a Certain Age” gets a big-screen adaptation after cancellation – but directed by “The Devil Wears Prada” (I’m actually being serious here) – as two aging Frat Pack comedians and the guy who has hosted “Saturday Night Live” the second most times in history go on a trip to fight their ennui by taking a trip in “The Big Year.”  Wait, maybe this is a remake …

Meanwhile, ’80s nostalgia runs rampant as “Footloose” and “The Thing” both get updated.  Note to bloggers/columnists: the question “Why aren’t the originals sufficient?” has been asked and answered dozens of times before.

Off the mainstream, “Trespass” begs the question of whether or not the Academy can revoke Nicolas Cage’s Oscar.  But on a more positive note, one of my favorite modern directors, Pedro Almodóvar, is back with his latest film, “The Skin I Live In.”  It didn’t get the strongest reviews out of Cannes, but it looks haunting and beautiful.  Plus, I’ll see just about anything he makes.

October 21

I’m legally prohibited from sharing any thoughts on “Martha Marcy May Marlene” until it hits theaters in Houston – but for now, enjoy the trailer.  And if you are really that curious about the movie, listen to “Marcy’s Song,” a tune from John Hawkes that plays briefly at the end.

How many times can we remake “The Three Musketeers?”  I’m calling it now that in 2022, the kids from “Slumdog Millionaire” will star as Athos, Porthos, and whatever Jamal’s final guess was.  Last year’s October release “Secretariat” gets remade for 2011 as “The Mighty Macs,” this time featuring the woman ahead of her time as a college basketball coach.  “Paranormal Activity 3” gets slightly creative as it goes back to the origins of the horror from the original, but it’s still a sell-out.

On the indie circuit, “Margin Call” boasts a quasi-“Contagion” level of prestige but doesn’t seem to be generating much buzz.  I guess that post-“Inside Job” and “Too Big to Fail,” recession backstories may be old and tired.

October 28

One of my biggest pet peeves is hearing about amazing movies that play at Sundance in January and then having to wait to see them until the end of the year.  Hopefully my patience will be rewarded with “Like Crazy,” the movie that everyone emerged from the festival talking about.  Felicity Jones and Anton Yelchin are two hot talents rising in the industry; hopefully this catches on with the mainstream and helps their careers skyrocket.

“In Time” could be an interesting mix of high-octane popcorn blockbuster and political allegory … or the trailer just gave off false notions.  I’ll have to hover over this one for a little while before deciding what my schedule for seeing it is.

The director of “2012” and “Independence Day” is making a movie with Oscar buzz?!  In what world do we live now?  Might as well check out “Anonymous” … apparently Rhys Ifan’s performance is startlingly good.

I wasn’t a big fan of “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas,” but “The Rum Diary” just looks like Hunter S. Thompson light.  Even with Johnny Depp back, this doesn’t look like it can drum up a lot of enthusiasm.  Speaking of not drumming up a lot of enthusiasm, how about “Johnny English Reborn?”  Waiting 8 years between installments doesn’t do you a lot of good when the original didn’t do particularly well.

So, are you more excited that I’m back burning up the blogosphere or that October is coming soon?  Take the poll, leave a comment, do whatever – but make your voice heard!





WTLFT: September 2011

18 08 2011

Summer comes to an abrupt halt in September as we shift from tentpole, blockbuster fare to dumpy, forgettable movies that studios drop here rather than release straight to video.  For the most part, that is.  You can decide for yourself if there are any bright spots in September.

September 2

Some claim Labor Day is the last “official” week of summer, but it’s now the perfect way to usher us into the month of September!  Take “Shark Night,” for instance.   I can imagine the rationale behind this movie: let’s stick a bunch of no-name teen actors in a lake, throw in a shark, film it with a 3D camera, call it a movie, and hope to come out in the black on it!  “Apollo 18” … yeah, “Transformers: Dark of the Moon” soured any small inkling of want I might have for another Apollo conspiracy.

And since it comes out on August 31, I’m going to technically classify “The Debt” a summer release.  If it’s as good as its trailer, it probably doesn’t deserve to be among these stinkers.  Jessica Chastain, Tom Wilkinson, Helen Mirren, the dude from “Avatar” (who has a name, Sam Worthington) – this is one I don’t plan to miss.

September 9

I haven’t watched the trailer for “Contagion” because apparently there’s a big spoiler in it.  But I’ll do my best to avoid it since I want to enjoy the movie as much as possible.  Steven Soderbergh, virus outbreak, Matt Damon, Marion Cotillard, Kate Winslet, playing at the Venice Film Festival – that’s like water in the desert.  Why ruin it?

I’ve seen “Warrior,” and you’ll hear my nonplussed comments on it later.  On the other hand , I will stay as far away as possible from the rank “Bucky Larson: Born to Be a Star.”  I’d rather bushido than sit through that torture.

Also, if you want to say you REALLY knew Rooney Mara before her humongous breakout role in December’s “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo,” then maybe you ought to see “Tanner Hall.”  But I don’t know if it’s anything I’m all that interested in.  What might be more interesting is “We Were Here,” a documentary about the early days of AIDS, or “Where Soldiers Come From,” a documentary about some friends who join the National Guard together.

September 16

Another trailer I don’t want to watch is that of “Drive,” the Ryan Gosling vehicle involving vehicles.  Directed by Nicholas Winding Refn, who unleashed the massive testosterone rush that is “Bronson” on us two years ago, this September sleeper could be seeing Oscar gold.  He won Best Director at Cannes – but then again, “The Tree of Life” won their equivalent of Best Picture, so I’m not sure how much I trust the Robert DeNiro jury.

In case the chicks are tired of “The Help” (and I assume that “One Day” will be long gone by this weekend), they get fresh food in the form of “I Don’t Know How She Does It,” a Sarah Jessica Parker working mom comedy.  And the never-sleeping remake culture goes on with the ultra-violent “Straw Dogs” – not for the women.  Except maybe Megan fromBridesmaids.”

On another note, can you feel the love tonight?  I can feel childhood nostalgia stirring…

On the indie side of things, there’s “Granito: How to Nail a Dictator,” a documentary about a filmmaker who does research in an attempt to nail some Guatemalan military officials, and the super-angsty teen romance “Restless,” a long-delayed project from Gus Van Sant.

September 23

“Abduction” seems somewhat original from the trailer … don’t know if Taylor Lautner can carry a thriller by himself though.  Expect plenty of gratuitous shirtlessness.  However, I will give them props for playing Sleigh Bells at the end.

The weekend’s other high-profile release is potential awards candidate “Moneyball,” based on the best-selling book by Michael Lewis, the guy who penned Best Picture nominee “The Blind Side.”  It’s directed by Bennett Miller, who received an Academy Award nomination for his work on “Capote.”  It stars two-time Oscar nominee Brad Pitt, Oscar winner Philip Seymour Hoffman, and a trimmed-down but non-Oscar nominated Jonah Hill.  It’s co-written by Aaron Sorkin, who won the Oscar last year for writing “The Social Network.”  Hopefully it earns buzz on its own merits, not just on these incredible credentials.

On opposite extremes of the MPAA spectrum are sure-fire disappointments “Dolphin Tale” for the youngsters and “Killer Elite” for the bullet crazy.  How can I make this projection so assuredly?  Their trailers both make them look derivative and unnecessary.

The independent releases this weekend are actually pretty impressive.  There’s “Machine Gun Preacher,” whose impressive story of philanthrophy and bravery could transcend the presence of Gerard Butler.  There’s also “Puncture,” which doesn’t look like your average legal thriller.  Who knows, Captain America Chris Evans might be able to show he has real acting chops!

September 30

This indie takes precedence over all other releases this weekend because Jeff Nichols’ “Take Shelter” looks like one of 2011’s saving graces.  The vastly underrated Michael Shannon gets a chance to deliver the powerhouse leading performance we all want in this drama of seemingly biblical proportions.  I’m excited to see where this movie goes because the trailer makes my stomach churn.

I’ve already had the chance to see “50/50,” and you’ll be hearing my raves for Joseph Gordon-Levitt and company right before the film’s release.  But for now, know that I recommend it.

R-rated comedy looks to keep taking its nosedive with “What’s Your Number?,” starring “Scary Movie” staple Anna Faris.  You can watch the trailer for “Dream House” and get a tiny yet fully-fleshed out horror movie in less than three minutes, which beats paying for trite fare like this at a theater.  “Courageous” seeks to fire up the Christian base like “Fireproof” and “Facing the Giants;” I’m curious to see if their success keeps increasing.

In other news, Kenneth Longeran’s “Margaret” finally sees the light of day after half a decade sitting on a shelf.

So, what are YOU looking forward to in September?  Anything?  Just the high-profile releases like “Contagion” and “Moneyball?”  Or are you just planning on staying at home and watching some football?!  Sound off or take the poll!





WTLFT: August 2011

7 07 2011

Hard to believe we can see the light at the end of the tunnel that is summer 2011.  So, here’s what to look forward to – or not – in the month of August.

August 5

“The Change-Up” – it’s “Freaky Friday,” but rated R and starring two dudes.  We’ll see how this goes.

Meanwhile, I’m still trying to figure out why on earth James Franco is doing “Rise of the Planet of the Apes.”  Between getting two doctorate degrees and just receiving an Oscar nomination, you would think he would have the smarts and the options to avoid making a movie like this for money or for résumé.  Then again, everyone nowadays has to go to drastic measures to pay for higher education in this country.

I feel like I have to embed the trailer for “Bellflower” rather than just link to it, simply because I can tell it isn’t trying to be like some other movie just to sell tickets.

Being a fan of both the novel and the film “One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest,” I have to see “Magic Trip,” Alex Gibney’s latest documentary which spotlights the book’s author Ken Kesey and his band of Merry Pranksters in the 1960s.

August 10/12

Getting a head start on the weekend by opening on Wednesday is “The Help,” which looks to be a late-summer sleeper, hoping to please the oft-neglected female crowd by adapting a best-selling book.  But with this one looking to be less geared towards one gender and even a potential awards play, this could outgross “Green Lantern” or other summer flops.

The premise of “30 Minutes or Less” feels, quite frankly, a little recycled.  But since it boasts the comedic talents of Aziz Ansari (the funniest part of “Parks & Recreation”), Danny McBride (the best part of “Pineapple Express“), and Jesse Eisenberg being reteamed with the director of the hilariously awesome “Zombieland,” it may end up being pretty good.

And because “THE Final Destination” wasn’t final enough, there’s “Final Destination 5,” which is shot in 3D.  Too bad the title “the 3D event of the summer” was already taken – and I don’t think they could stretch it into 5 dimensions quite yet.  There’s also a “Glee” concert movie in 3D in case you haven’t spent enough buying their singles on iTunes.

August 19

Is it just me, or does “Fright Night” = “Disturbia” + zombies?  Also, Anton Yelchin is keeping crazy busy.  He beat unemployment.

As for a last big summer action movie, count me out for “Conan the Barbarian.”  You can even count me out for the inevitable Arnold Schwarzenegger classics marathon that will be running all weekend on Spike.  I think I’ll pass on the latest “Spy Kids” movie as well, which is a TOTAL sell-out of a series that I actually loved when I was 8.  Aroma-scope?  Gross.

August 26

I will see ANY movie with Paul Rudd, so “Our Idiot Brother” is a must-see for me.  It’s only made better by the fact that it played at Sundance to a great deal of acclaim.  Huzzah!

There is no trailer available yet for “Higher Ground” (grr!), but I think this may be my must-see movie of August … because I probably won’t get to see it until December.  Vera Farmiga’s directorial debut, a religious movie, just Vera Farmiga in general – sign me up!

In other indie news, the 2010 TIFF debut “Brighton Rock,” Rowan Joffe’s remake of the old British film, finally sees release in America.  “Chasing Madoff” looks like a sleek documentary, but I’m wondering what will distinguish it from the perfectly good “Frontline” special on PBS that unfurled his whole story.  “Circumstance” brings Iranian youth to the screen, and again I have to wonder what makes this any different than a live action version of “Persepolis” set in the present day.

I wasn’t the biggest “Pan’s Labyrinth” enthusiast, so Guillermo del Toro’s “Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark” isn’t necessarily high on my list for the weekend.  Nor is “Colombiana,” the Zoe Saldana-starrer which looks like a carbon copy of Luc Besson’s “The Professional.”  Oh, it’s also directed by him … coincidence?  I think NOT!

So, what do you think will please crowds in August?  Are you looking for one last bang from the summer – or for it to just end already?  Sound off in the comments AND take the poll!





WTLFT: July 2011

8 06 2011

Yeah, I shortened the name.  It’s a lot more palatable.  This post will tell you What To Look Forward To in the month of July.  We have transformers, captains, teen stars, teen wizards, sex friends, zoo friends, hellish bosses, honey bears, and smurfs – just to name a few.  Here they all are; you can make up your mind if any of these actually appeal to you.

July 1

Cheating- “Transformers: Dark of the Moon” actually comes out on June 29, and, if you want to get really technical, June 28 at 9:00 in IMAX 3D and RealD 3D.  So while you curse me for my horrific crimes against nature, humanity, and blogging, watch the trailer and decide for yourself whether or not you want to subject yourself to Shia LaBeouf and a lot of loud noises orchestrated by Michael Bay.

On the quieter side of things, Tom Hanks and Julia Roberts plan to use their star power to fill seats at “Larry Crowne,” which looks like perfectly middle-of-the-road rom-com territory.  On the louder side of things again – and by louder, I mean girlish screams and constantly ringing cell phones – “Monte Carlo” gives young girls what they need during the summer.  A nice helping of Selena Gomez, Katie Cassidy, and Leighton Meester should have the tweeners saying “OMG!” until the next season of “Wizards of Waverly Place” hits the small screen. (There’s also a creepy thriller called “The Perfect Host” starring David Hyde Pierce, which I feel obliged to mention since it’s the only indie offering amidst these studio genre pics.)

July 8

Fingers crossed that “Horrible Bosses” will be funny!  I remember reading a piece on a blog for The Los Angeles Times well before the movie started production that praised it, so hopefully it stuck to the script.  If it’s a hit, I motion for Jennifer Aniston to stop doing horrible rom-com fare and stick to raunchy comedy; I chuckle every time I watch the trailer and hear her say, “Shabbat shalom; someone’s circumcised!”

As for “Zookeeper” … well, I hope the kids enjoy it.

I’ve definitely been going through a documentary phase ever since last year’s “Inside Job” rocked my world, and Michael Rappaport’s “Beats, Rhymes, & Life: The Travels of a Tribe Called Quest” could feed my obsession quite well.  It follows the titular hip-hop group (known as A Tribe Called Quest if you are as clueless as I was) from formation to fame.  Best case scenario it provides a fascinating expose of the craft of rapping much like “Joan Rivers: A Piece of Work” did for standup comedy last summer.  Worst case scenario I get to see some of my favorite artists talking about a group I’ve never heard of before.

Another interesting documentary (that I can only PRAY makes it to Houston sometime before I leave for college) is “Project Nim,” the story of a chimpanzee experiment.  I’ve always been interested in stories where lines and boundaries we once thought clear are exposed and shown to be more porous and relative than we thought, and this looks to deliver on a big scale.

July 15

Some tiny little series ends on screen.  It’s no big deal, it’s not like these movies define my youth.  It’s not like it’s a worldwide phenomenon.  But in all seriousness, I’m not going to cry.  “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 2” – BRING IT ON!

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